• ‘Hamlet’ as Lenten Fare

    It has been a hard winter in lots of ways, and my spiritual life is not immune to the toll the virus took. That said, one upside of the interruption is that I have made an unlikely substitution for what would have been conventional devotional reading in a more typical year: Shakespeare’s Hamlet.

  • Concerning Humility

    When I was eight, I saw the photo of Muhammad Ali delivering the knockout to Sonny Liston. I was awestruck. The next Saturday, when I was lucky enough to win my little league wrestling match, I tried to replicate Ali’s pose. My parents called me up to the bleachers and I received an early lesson in humility.

  • How Karl Marx Saved My Christmas

    I was combing through Barbies, Lego sets, and the latest versions of Monopoly in search of something to give my two-year old for Christmas. Nothing particularly excited me, and there was nothing I could think of that he actually needed. My limited parenting experience told me he would get more entertainment out of the box and wrapping paper than the actual item anyway. But it seemed bad form simply not to buy my child a Christmas gift. So there I stood.

  • Zombies on Your Mind?

    Just what is consciousness and how does it work? What does it mean that I am aware? That I am aware of myself? Does it arise entirely from the brain? Is it a function of a soul? Are other animals conscious? How would we know? Does individual consciousness survive beyond death? And what about ... zombies?

  • Neither Modern nor Post-Modern: Newman on Certitude

    Our reasoning might be user-relative, but truth is not itself relative. Our path to truth is only as subjects who seek it out from particular perspectives, but we must reject what C. S. Lewis later called “the poison of subjectivism” which posits that there are only perspectives and no full picture to which those perspectives attach.

  • Drawing or Color, Part IV: The Philosophers Weigh In

    Over the past several months, Veritas Journal has featured several quick takes on the long-running debate between line and color in the history of western art. Imagine for a moment if we could transpose this debate into another key ... What might modern philosophers have to say on the question?

  • By an Unexpected Way

    There are a lot of people who would like to do something beautiful for God, but they have no idea where to start ... they are hungry to draw close to God and they want to do something with him, but they don't know how. I'm hoping people will read these stories and realize they don't need to know how!